Penn Mellon Fellows |
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Mellon Fellows

Provost Wendell Pritchett and Vice Provost for Faculty Laura Perna are pleased to announce the inaugural cohort of Mellon Fellows.

The Mellon Fellows Program seeks to support mid-career faculty from core humanities and arts disciplines and whose work is strongly based on cultural/historical analysis. The program is intended to orient arts and humanities faculty to the fundamentals of leadership roles, encourage collaboration and community across departments and disciplines, and build the next generation of higher education leaders inflected with humanistic culture and values.

2021 Mellon Fellows

Ericka Beckman, Associate Professor and Graduate Chair of Romance Languages in the School of Arts and Sciences, researches the narratives of capitalist modernity and modernization in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Latin America.

Kimberly Bowes, Professor of Classical Studies and Director of Integrated Studies in the School of Arts and Sciences, studies archaeology and material culture of the Roman and later Roman worlds and historical economies with a particular focus on poverty and the lived experience of the poor.

Jean Christophe Cloutier, Associate Professor of English in the School of Arts and Sciences, teaches 20th Century and contemporary American literature involving popular culture, notably comics and cinema.

James Ker, Associate Professor of and Undergraduate Chair of Classical Studies in the School of Arts and Sciences, researches the cultural history of the Roman world, both in antiquity and in its reception.

Sonal Khullar, Associate Professor of South Asian Studies in the School of Arts and Sciences, studies the art of South Asia from the eighteenth century onward with a particular interest in histories of cosmopolitanism, postcolonial art worlds, art-writing and life-writing, critical historiographies of art, aesthetic theories, feminist geography, the anthropology of art, cross-cultural exchange, and the problem of comparison across areas and periods.

David Kim, Associate Professor of History of Art in the School of Arts and Sciences, studies Southern Renaissance art, with focus on the issues of art literature, transcultural exchange, and material culture.

Zachary Lesser, Professor of English in the School of Arts and Sciences, teaches Shakespeare and early modern drama, the history of material texts, bibliography and editing, early modern political and religious debate, and digital humanities.

Heather Sharkey, Professor and Chair of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in the School of Arts and Sciences, is a historian of the Middle East and Africa, and of the modern Christian and Islamic worlds.

Daniel Singer, Associate Professor of Philosophy in the School of Arts and Sciences, researches the theories of epistemic normativity and group deliberation. He uses agent-based computer models to better understand how groups of people reason together.

Ramya Sreenivasan, Associate Professor of History in the School of Arts and Sciences, studies society, politics, and culture in second-millennium South Asia: the period between the thirteenth century and the present in northern India.

Emily Steinlight, Associate Professor of English in the School of Arts and Sciences, studies nineteenth-century British literature, with a focus on the relationship between political thought and literary form, as well as the history and theory of the novel, mass politics, the Victorian natural and social sciences, and critical theory.

Amy Stornaiuolo, Associate Professor of Literacy, Culture, and International Education in the Graduate School of Education, studies adolescents’ multimodal composing practices, teachers’ uses of digital technologies, and shifting relationships between authors and audiences in online, networked spaces.

Julia Wilker, Associate Professor of Classical Studies in the School of Arts and Sciences, researches the Near East in Hellenistic and Roman times, on the history of Judaea from the Maccabean revolt to the second century CE.